Skip To Main Content

All Course Descriptions

Please note: Workshop descriptions for the Lamplighter Writing Institute can be found here.


College Prep for students entering grades 10-12

 

Major Courses

ENGLISH

ACADEMIC WRITING
Gain the scholarly skills that will be crucial throughout your high school and college careers: developing and writing research papers, persuasive essays, and literary analysis. You’ll concentrate on creating strong thesis statements, building focused paragraphs, and looking deeply at individual texts. You’ll engage in extensive freewriting, peer editing, and note taking to help you build a strong foundation. Weekly reviews of grammar and punctuation rules are an important component of the class, as are exercises designed to hone each student’s individual writing voice. (Five weeks, non-credit)

COLLEGE WRITING
This advanced writing course will focus on AP English content and will prepare you for the language and composition class that may be in your future as a high school junior or senior. You’ll learn the fundamentals of rhetoric and dive into college-level texts. You’ll study argumentative and analytical prose techniques while furthering your literary synthesis skills. Covering a full academic year’s content is rigorous work — good preparation for college. (Five-weeks, for credit. Meets requirement for an NMH English credit, however students are still required to take an English course each academic year.)

CREATIVE WRITING
What do YOU want to say? In this course, you’ll explore and experiment with the writing of fiction, personal essays, and poetry, developing your own ideas as you produce a portfolio of work. You’ll work in groups and one-on-one with the instructor, and you’ll engage in workshop-style feedback sessions as well as peer editing. Assignments often are tailored for individual students in response to needs and interests. You’ll read a variety of works to facilitate both discussions of what constitutes good writing and experimentation in your own work. (Five weeks, non-credit)

 

MATH

These courses are designed to cover a full year of curriculum in five weeks. Students should expect a fast-paced, intensive course, and must demonstrate a pattern of high achievement with a recommendation from their current math teacher. While some of these courses are for credit, NMH cannot guarantee credit or acceleration at another school. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain approval from their school prior to the course.

ALGEBRA I 
This class covers a full academic year of content and includes the following topics: properties of mathematical systems; solution of equations and inequalities; solution of equations that involve square root and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and systems, slope, and intercepts; graphs of inequalities; operations on polynomials and on rational and irrational expressions; and solution of quadratic equations by factoring and by the quadratic formula. The solution of word problems is an integral part of the course. (Five weeks, for credit, on-campus only.)

GEOMETRY 
This class covers a full academic year of content with the objective of developing geometric ideas logically, using deductive and inductive reasoning and direct and indirect proof. Topics include the properties of triangles and other polygons, parallel and perpendicular lines, congruence and similarity, circles, and the properties of solids. Prerequisite: Algebra I. (Five weeks, for credit, online or on-campus.)

ALGEBRA II
This class covers a full academic year of content (excluding trigonometry) and includes review of Algebra I, functions and relations, linear functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions and complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational algebraic functions, irrational algebraic functions, and quadratic systems. There is an emphasis on solving word problems using mathematical models in real-world applications. A Texas Instruments graphing calculator (TI-Nspire CAS) is required. Prerequisite: Algebra I. (Five weeks, for credit, online or on-campus.)

PRECALCULUS
This class covers a full academic year of content and is designed to prepare you for Advanced Placement AB or BC calculus. It includes detailed study of polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions. Special emphasis is placed on graphs of these functions to gain insight into their behavior. A Texas Instruments graphing calculator (TI-Nspire CAS) is required. Prerequisite: Algebra II. (Five weeks, for credit, online or on-campus.)

CALCULUS
In Calculus, you will build on your work in Precalculus by beginning a study of differentiation and integration of the elementary functions, with an emphasis on problem-solving and deepening your understanding of algebraic topics. You will finish this course with a solid foundation in introductory differential and integral calculus. (Five weeks, for credit, on-campus only.)

STATISTICS
This introductory course covers numerical and graphical analysis of quantitative and categorical variables, applications of the normal distribution, and linear regression, as well as probability, experimental design and sampling methods, and continuous and discrete random variables. You will be exposed to sampling distributions and Statistical Inference, including the main types of both confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. This course is modeled after a traditional non-AP high school course. (Five weeks, for credit, on-campus only.)

DISCRETE MATH WITH PYTHON
This course is the intersection of mathematics and computer science. You will build on your Precalculus foundation and study mathematical sets, algorithms, sequences and sums, and vectors and matrices. While the focus will be on understanding the theory behind these concepts, you will use the programming language Python to enhance your understanding through practical applications. You will leave this course with a solid foundation of computer science in general, and coding in Python specifically, as well as an improved understanding of functions. (Three weeks, non-credit.)


SCIENCE

BIOETHICS
Would you choose to determine how tall your child would be before they were conceived? Would you ensure your child would be disease-free — by manipulating their genome? Bioethics is an interdisciplinary class that studies biology and ethics as they relate to advances in reproductive technology, medicine, and research. In this accelerated course, we will examine historical and current issues around bioethics and pose the question: Just because we can do something, does that mean we should? (Five weeks, for credit.)

BIOLOGY 
This course builds an understanding of the molecules and substances important to cell structure and function, then expands to genetics and organismal biology, and wraps up with evolution and ecology. Explore key principles and concepts with emphasis on how cells work and ultimately how the whole organism depends on those cellular processes. Participate in class discussions and small-group projects and presentations, and observe laboratory investigations. For some units of study, you will choose a specific topic to research or design a lab procedure to explore your own question. (Five weeks, for credit.)

CHEMISTRY 
This course delves into the study of matter and how it changes by examining topics such as atomic structure, periodicity, and bonding; names, formulas, and reactions of chemical substances; the mole concept and stoichiometry; thermo-chemistry; gas behavior; kinetic theory; and equilibrium. We will emphasize independent preparation, student-driven exploration, discussion-based projects and assessments, and virtual labs and activities. (Five weeks, for credit.)

UNDERSTANDING YOUR MIND: NEUROSCIENCE AND COGNITION 
This course will delve into basic brain and neural anatomy with a special focus on the intersection of the brain and the mind. Drawing from current theories and various sources, we will investigate the relationships between cognitive processes such as perception, learning, memory, decision-making, problem-solving, and neural functioning. We will also explore tools and techniques for cognitive enhancement — how to get smarter! (Three weeks, non-credit.)


HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

Social Justice and Power: Exploring Literature and Oppression
This course is designed to improve inter-group relations by breaking down barriers as well as developing an appreciation of diverse social identities. We will work on increasing personal awareness of our own identities, expanding knowledge of other identities and social and historical issues surrounding diversity, and encouraging action so you can see yourself as an agent of change in creating a more just and equitable world. (Five weeks, DSJ credit for NMH students.)

WORLD RELIGIONS AND CONTEMPORARY ISSUES
World Religions and Contemporary Issues provides in-depth examinations of at least three religious traditions and their impact on the modern world. You will explore the way religion intersects with history, culture, and politics while also exploring how religion shapes an individual’s worldview, belief structure, and actions. You will learn to critically and respectfully evaluate the impact of religion on today’s world. (Five weeks, for credit.) 

GLOBAL ETHICS AND CLIMATE CHANGE
In this course, taught collaboratively by teachers from the departments of religious studies and philosophy and history and social sciences, you will explore some of the greatest challenges and trends affecting humanity in the 21st century: globalization, socio-economic inequities, competition for resources, and, most notably, climate change. You will discuss questions of moral responsibility and fairness related to climate change as you explore different ethical systems and how they may be applied to the questions posed by climate change and global inequities. You will also examine innovations in technology, governance, and business that can help people adapt to or mitigate the compounding effects of these global challenges. You will evaluate and design approaches to making a more sustainable world. (Five weeks, for credit.) 

PSYCHOLOGY
How does the mind work? How do our thoughts and emotions shape our actions in the world? Are there differences in the way people learn? This course covers a full academic year of content and uses literature, library research, experiments, and group projects to dive into the study of human behavior. You’ll explore traditional topics such as learning, memory, development, personality, the biological basis of behavior, and psychotherapy. You’ll also delve into newer sub-fields of study such as forensic (criminal) psychology, health psychology, the psychology of terrorism, and gender psychology. The practical application of psychology to everyday life is a major focus of the course. (Five weeks, for credit.) 

U.S. HISTORY
Looking back helps us think about the future. This intensive course covers a full academic year of content and moves chronologically through the American past, looking at the United States as it developed from an agrarian society to an urban-industrial global power. You’ll read the work of eminent historians, engage in seminar discussions, do independent research, and write your own work, all with the goal of including a variety of perspectives. The course includes a research paper and multiple essays focused on critically assessing issues in U.S. history. (Five weeks, for credit.) 

ECONOMICS 
You make economic decisions every day. Do you buy what you want or what you need? Why should anyone care if the stock market drops 500 points or if the price of oil doubles? Economics is the study of how people use their limited resources. Covering a full academic year of content, this course investigates the microeconomic perspective — individual behavior and business decisions — as well as the macroeconomic perspective — growth, inflation, trade, and employment. The work will benefit both students going forward in math and other studies that require analytical thinking and students leaning toward political science and history. (Five weeks, for credit.) 


Minor Course Options

College Prep minor courses meet in the afternoon from 1:30 to 3 pm. For students taking a full credit course, which meets in the morning and for the first period in the afternoon, you may choose to do sports, take SAT prep, or join a Rising Scholars minor course for the final period of the day from 3:30 to 5 pm.

ASTRONOMY
Ever gazed up at the sky and wondered what’s out there? How was the Earth created? How big is the universe? What is a black hole? This course will answer these questions and so much more. NMH’s observatory is a wonderful location for viewing and studying stars and planets due to the minimal amount of light “pollution” from neighboring houses and towns. The course includes a daily classroom component as well as two evening viewing sessions per week. (Offered 3:30–5 pm instead of sports. Open to students in grades 7–12.)

AVIATION
You will learn the basics of aviation such as the four forces of flight (lift, drag, thrust, and gravity), airport sectional charts, controls of an airplane, navigation, drone flight, weather, flight planning, and airport operations. You will be able to fly the classroom simulator and learn the basics of take-off, maneuvering, and landing the airplane. You will fly gliders and drones to experience the knowledge they had gained first-hand, with field trips off-campus to a local airport to learn about pre-flighting an airplane and observe actual take-offs and landings of single-engine airplanes. (Offered 3:30–5 pm instead of sports. This class is open to students in grades 7–12.)

CERAMICS
Work with your hands and get creative with clay! You’ll learn the hand-building techniques of pinching, coiling, and slab building, as well as how to throw simple functional pottery on the wheel like cups and bowls. In addition to learning about form, space, texture, and function, you will be introduced to alternative firing techniques and various options for surface decoration to find your creative voice. 

COMMUNITY AND SERVICE
Get involved with the community! This course is all about building awareness of local and global needs and working with various organizations to offer support. Our discussions, fundraising efforts and activities will focus on issues such as homelessness and housing, health care, education, and children’s welfare. 

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Capture the world around you! Brush up on camera basics; master shutter speed, apertures, depth-of-field, and flash. You’ll work to take high-quality photographs under varying conditions, and you’ll experiment with landscape photography, close-ups, portraits, and athletic events. You must have your own digital SLR camera.

DRAMA
Are you theatrical? Do you love to perform? In this course, you’ll explore acting, improvisation, and mime. You’ll practice monologues and prepare a production to be presented to the campus community at the end of the session.

DRAWING AND PAINTING
Express your creativity and capture the world around you in bright colors — or black and white. This course will be tailored to you and your individual interests and abilities and is an opportunity for students of all levels to develop skills in drawing and painting. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING
Get rid of stage fright forever and prepare yourself for all those presentations facing you in high school and college. Learn the principles of effective public speaking and practice, practice, practice! You’ll try various forms of public address, from brief improvisational talks to formal speeches.

RENEWABLE ENERGY
Our changing climate has created a great need to change our policies about how we generate electricity. Build your knowledge and awareness of renewable energy sources and how they can make our world more sustainable. In addition to classroom time, you’ll head out on field trips to local solar, wind, and hydroelectric power facilities.

ROBOTICS
Investigate! Design! Solve problems! And, yes, create a robot! You’ll begin with the history of robotics and move on to learning the basic components of a robotic system. You’ll experiment with the various methods that make robots move, with sensors, and with programming. Students must provide their own Chromebook or Windows-based Mac laptop. (Offered 3:30–5 pm instead of sports.)

SAT PREPARATION
Get strategic! This course, taught by Summit Educational Group instructors, focuses on the academic skills and test-taking techniques you need to succeed on the SAT. You’ll get support and guidance based on your individual needs that will maximize your scoring potential. There are several options (available on campus only):

  • #1 SAT Math and Verbal: 1:30–3 pm, four days per week (you’ll do a sport 3:30–5 pm, four days per week)
  • #2 SAT Math and Verbal: 3:30–5 pm, four days per week (if you choose this option, you won’t do a sport)
  • #3 SAT Math only: 3:30–5 pm, two days a week (you’ll do a sport the other two days)
  • #4 SAT Verbal only: 3:30–5 pm, two days a week (you’ll do a sport the other two days)

     NOTE: For students in the three-week session, you may only choose option #1.

Summit course fees: 
Five-week 

  • Options 1 or 2: $950
  • Options 3 or 4: $450.

(Summit will reduce these fees for students who receive NMH Summer Session financial aid.)

Three-week 

  • Option 1 only: $575

 

SUMMER SESSION SINGERS
Bring your love of music to like-minded peers and collaborate with your voices. You’ll learn songs and practice together, with music selections based on your collective interests. No experience is necessary, and the ability to read music is not required.

 

******************************

 

Rising Scholars for students entering grades 7-9

MATH

PRE-ALGEBRA
Gain a strong foundation in the most important concepts of algebra. You’ll study variables and properties, solve equations and inequalities, learn about functions and graphing, work with triangles and lay a foundation for geometry, and build the skills you need for success in future mathematics courses. (Period 1 or 2: 8:30 am or 10:15 am ET)

ADVANCED MATH OPTIONS
The following math courses are designed to cover a full year of curriculum in five weeks. Students should expect a fast-paced, intensive course, and must demonstrate a pattern of high achievement with a recommendation from their current math teacher. While these courses are for credit, NMH cannot guarantee credit or acceleration at another school. It is the student’s responsibility to obtain approval from their school prior to commencing the course.

ALGEBRA I (see College Prep section): On campus only.
ALGEBRA II (see College Prep section): Available online or on campus
GEOMETRY (see College Prep section): Available online or on campus


ENGLISH

SKILLS IN LITERATURE
The goal of this course is to encourage you to enjoy reading. Develop skills in understanding and analyzing fiction, drama, and poetry through daily reading and writing assignments. We’ll read and discuss fiction of different styles; study fundamental elements such as plot, setting, and theme; and relate the literature to your own experiences. Vocabulary is studied daily to enhance comprehension. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)

THE WORLD OF THE SHORT STORY 
In this course, you’ll write your own short story. Learn the pieces that make up a short story and how setting, characters, and plot fit together. We’ll read and discuss short stories that are realistic as well as those that stray from the real world, and tackle writing assignments to help you ultimately create your own work. (Period 2 only: 10:15 am ET)

THE ART OF WRITING 
Are you a poet in the making? Do you have a story to tell? In this course, you’ll try your hand at different types of writing such as essays, drama, fiction, and poetry. You’ll also read short stories, essays, and poems; practice free-writing; and develop and revise your own work with feedback from the teacher and classmates. (Periods 1 or 2: 8:15 am or 10:15 am ET)


SCIENCE

FORENSIC SCIENCE
This course is an introduction to the principles and practices of forensic science, which starts with crime scene investigation. You’ll learn about collecting and processing evidence, and scientific tools and techniques for analyzing certain types of evidence. Pattern recognition — including fingerprint analysis, document analysis, and ballistics analysis — may be emphasized. Case studies of actual crime scenes will be presented and discussed. A background in biology or chemistry is not required, but we’ll cover basic forensic biology and chemistry topics such as DNA analysis, hair analysis, toxicology, and materials analysis. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)

MARINE BIOLOGY
The ocean is like a layer cake that covers two-thirds of our planet. Discover the creatures that live in it, how they interact with each other, and how they adapt to the various marine environments within the ocean. Examine the effects that pollution and human activities, such as fishing, have on our oceans and discover how you can make a difference. (Period 2 only: 10:30 am ET)

FIELD BIOLOGY
The environment really does make all the difference. Northfield Mount Hermon is the perfect place to take your education outdoors. In this class, you’ll explore and study habitats, plants and animals, and environmental issues on our campus that is situated on the beautiful Connecticut River and surrounded by forests, streams, fields, and freshwater ponds. You’ll also work in the classroom and lab. (Period 2 only: 10:15 am ET)

PANDEMICS & PLAGUES THROUGH HISTORY
Living with COVID-19 have you ever wondered how viruses spread, what causes them, how does your body fight them, and how do vaccines work? Look back in history to the Black Death, Yellow Fever, and the Spanish Flu for example and see how they impacted society, and look at how epidemics such as AIDS, H1N1, Ebola, and COVID-19 have impacted modern day society. Understanding the challenges that face us and how they were handled in the past, will help us formulate plans for the future! (Period 2 only: 10:15 am ET)


HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCE

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY
How do people think about themselves and others? What motivates their behavior? Using literature, experiments, and group projects, we’ll learn how humans interact, communicate, and connect with others. We’ll examine positive and negative influences such as decision making, group behavior, attraction, aggression, and factors that promote health and well-being. We’ll make observations, conduct experiments, and report findings as we seek to understand the thoughts, feelings, and behavior of individuals. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)

HEROES AND VILLAINS  
In this course, we’ll dive into the epic struggle between good and evil. Embark upon a hero’s journey through literature, film, legend, and history. Are villains just heroes of their own stories? How can YOU be a hero in your own life? Through discussion and consideration of heroes and villains ranging from Achilles and Agamemnon to Iron Man and Thanos, we’ll look at morality in a whole new light and deepen our perceptions of heroism and villainy. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)

MEDIEVAL HISTORY 
Sharpen your sword, don your armor, and saddle up your warhorse! Learn about knighthood, chivalry, and the art of battle. Explore castles, investigate the inner workings of the church, and step into the shoes of an average peasant. Discover why legendary heroes — both real and mythical — such as Joan of Arc, King Arthur of Camelot, and Marco Polo continue to influence our stories and culture today. A world of honor, duty, and adventure awaits! (Period 2 only: 10:15 am ET)

SUSTAINABLE SOLUTIONS
This course will strengthen design-thinking skills through challenges to solve large- and small-scale environmental problems. We will focus on climate change and food systems, building out prototypes and working together to challenge assumptions and strengthen creative approaches to problem-solving. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)
 

ARTS

Theater
Whether you want to take center stage or work behind the scenes, you’ll get a taste of live theatre as literature, production, and performance. Learn about acting techniques such as scene study, improvisation, vocal production, and stage movement. Perform both short scenes and monologues. Get to know the basics of stage production in set design and construction, design and use of lighting, elements of costume design, and the use and construction of props. (Period 1 only: 8:30 am ET)

Studio Art
Anyone can be an artist! Try your hand at drawing in pencil, charcoal, and ink. Then, dabble with pastels, watercolors, and acrylics. You’ll even have the chance to work with linoleum-block printmaking, collage, clay and 3-D sculpture. Open to students of all levels. (Period 2 only: 10:15 am ET)
 

MORNING WORKSHOPS

The World Around Us: Global Environmental Issues 
Build awareness of the critical issues affecting our world today. From climate change to recycling, farming methods to pollution, and sustainability to animal cruelty. Learn the facts, and discover how you can make a difference. (Three weeks, July 2–23, on-campus only, grades 7–9)

Exploration of Physical Sciences
In this three-week course, students will explore a variety of topics in physics, chemistry and geology based on the unique resources available in our state-of-the-art Gilder science building. Topics explored will include analyzing motion in one and two dimensions, understanding the structure of matter, and exploring the stories recorded in the rocks and fossils of the local environment around NMH. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on exploration and discovery, as well as building laboratory skills that will support a sound foundation for any high school science class.

The Lamplighter Writing Institute  
Have a story to tell? Enjoy writing poems? Want to write a screenplay? Or do you want to learn more about journalism? Maybe you just want to improve your writing this summer. Choose from one of these genres - Fiction, Screenwriting, Journalism, Narrative Nonfiction, and Poetry. (Two weeks, on campus July 2–16, or online July 4–15, grades 7–12.)

 

Minor Course Options

College Prep minor courses meet in the afternoon from 1:30 to 3 pm. For students taking a full credit course, which meets in the morning and for the first period in the afternoon, you may choose to do sports, take SAT prep, or join a Rising Scholars minor course for the final period of the day from 3:30 to 5 pm.

ASTRONOMY
Ever gazed up at the sky and wondered what’s out there? How was the Earth created? How big is the universe? What is a black hole? This course will answer these questions and so much more. NMH’s observatory is a wonderful location for viewing and studying stars and planets due to the minimal amount of light “pollution” from neighboring houses and towns. The course includes a daily classroom component as well as two evening viewing sessions per week. 

AVIATION
You will learn the basics of aviation such as the four forces of flight (lift, drag, thrust, and gravity), airport sectional charts, controls of an airplane, navigation, drone flight, weather, flight planning, and airport operations. You will be able to fly the classroom simulator and learn the basics of take-off, maneuvering, and landing the airplane. You will fly gliders and drones to experience the knowledge they had gained first-hand, with field trips off-campus to a local airport to learn about pre-flighting an airplane and observe actual take-offs and landings of single-engine airplanes. 

COMMUNITY AND SERVICE
Get involved with the community! This course is all about building awareness of local and global needs and working with various organizations to offer support. Our discussions, fundraising efforts and activities will focus on issues such as homelessness and housing, health care, education, and children’s welfare. 

DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
Capture the world around you! Brush up on camera basics; master shutter speed, apertures, depth-of-field, and flash. You’ll work to take high-quality photographs under varying conditions, and you’ll experiment with landscape photography, close-ups, portraits, and athletic events. You must have your own digital SLR camera.

DRAMA
Are you theatrical? Do you love to perform? In this course, you’ll explore acting, improvisation, and mime. You’ll practice monologues and prepare a production to be presented to the campus community at the end of the session.

DRAWING AND PAINTING
Express your creativity and capture the world around you in bright colors — or black and white. This course will be tailored to you and your individual interests and abilities and is an opportunity for students of all levels to develop skills in drawing and painting. 

LEARNING STRATEGIES AND SKILLS
Hone your study techniques and become a more efficient learner. Learn to plan and be organized, build skills such as note-taking, skim-reading, citations, bibliographies, and memorization. You will also look at how best to present your work, and will practice with PowerPoint, Google, and Excel.

PRACTICAL ECONOMICS
Ever wonder what the Dow Jones Industrial Index actually is? Or how the stock market operates? In this course, we’ll look broadly at simple economic principles and approaches to responsible personal financial management. Even if you have no knowledge of or experience with the business world, you’ll gain an understanding of financial and economic topics that will help you throughout your life.

RENEWABLE ENERGY
Our changing climate has created a great need to change our policies about how we generate electricity. Build your knowledge and awareness of renewable energy sources and how they can make our world more sustainable. In addition to classroom time, you’ll head out on field trips to local solar, wind, and hydroelectric power facilities.

ROBOTICS
Investigate! Design! Solve problems! And, yes, create a robot! You’ll begin with the history of robotics and move on to learning the basic components of a robotic system. You’ll experiment with the various methods that make robots move, with sensors, and with programming. Students must provide their own Chromebook or Windows-based Mac laptop. 

SCULPTURE
Do you like working with your hands and building things? In this course, you'll make three-dimensional sculptures in various media, like wire, stone, clay, plaster, and paper, and play with line and form in space. We'll explore the elements and principles of design as well as be introduced to the evolution of humankind as seen through three-dimensional artwork.  

SSAT Preparation
This course, taught by instructors from the Summit Educational Group, focuses on the test-taking strategies and academic skills you’ll need to succeed on the SSAT. Summit will customize its instruction to meet your individual needs and maximize your scoring potential. The course covers both math and verbal sections. This course is not available online.
Summit’s fee: 

  • Five-week: $950
  • Three-week: $575

This fee will be reduced for students who receive financial aid.

Offered as a minor course from 3:30 to 5 pm Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday afternoons.

 

 

******************************

 

English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) for students entering grades 7-12

MAIN COURSE

This program is for international students who want to improve their English language skills in order to enroll in an American high school or university. There are classes for all levels. Students will be placed in the appropriate level (from beginning to advanced) through an English-language placement test.   

Our experienced ESOL teachers and small classes provide a supportive environment with individual attention. The curriculum contains an array of opportunities for growth, including but not limited to: reading novels, writing essays, giving oral presentations, researching American culture, and interacting with students from all over the world.

The program consists of three hours of instruction per day, Monday through Saturday. Students also choose a minor course and sport in the afternoon.

For minor course options please refer to either College Prep Minors or Rising Scholars Minors (depending on your grade).


 


Ready to take the next step?

INQUIReAPPLY HERE